Mindy Solomon Gallery

Mindy Solomon Gallery

8397 NE 2 Ave
Miami, FL 33138
[email protected]
mindysolomon.com
786-953-6917

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1

Linda Lopez
Sherbert Wiggle Dust Furry with Green Cut Outs, 2019
Porcelain
13 x 5.5 x 5.25 in.

In Pursuit of a Meaningful Mark

March 14—April 25, 2020

Andrew Casto
Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)
Roberto Gomez
Alex McLeod
Mathew McConnell
Osamu Kobayashi
Jason Stopa
Linda Lopez
Russell Tyler
Kadar Brock
Cody Hoyt

Each of these artists employs maximalist or post-minimalist approaches to abstraction. The past decade has witnessed a number of alternative perspectives to abstraction that fall within the spectrum of these polarities. This group often finds a formal language between the two.
1

Roberto Gomez
Untitled, 2016
Black printing ink on latex
70 x 120 in.

2

Osamu Kobayashi
Slit, 2020
Oil on canvas
18 x 16 in.

3

Jason Stopa
Green Window, 2018
Oil on canvas
25 x 20 in.

1

Kadar Brock
cleaning brushes, teal red slashes, 2020
Oil on canvas
24 x 20 in.

2

Kadar Brock
cleaning brushes, dark and blue, 2020
Oil on canvas
24 x 20 in.

3

Andrew Casto
Assorted works

4

Cody Hoyt
Untitled, 2020
Stoneware, porcelain, Purpleheart, Yellowheart, and epoxy
23 x 28 in.

5

Cody Hoyt
Low Oblique Vessel, 2020
Ceramic
8 x 13 x 7 in.

6

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)
An Unlikely Messenger #4, 2018
Acrylic, ink, gouache, colored pencil, feathers, handmade paper and collage on paper
62.7 x 22.625 in.

7

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)
Ascending #3, 2014
Acrylic, ink, colored pencil, feathers, quills, handmade paper, flocking, crystals and mica on canvas mounted on Sintra
68 x 53.25 in.

8

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)
An Unlikely Messenger #3, 2018
Acrylic, ink, gouache, colored pencil, quills, feathers, and collage on paper
62.7 x 22.625 in.

1

Cody Hoyt
Low Oblique Vessel, 2020
Ceramic
8 x 13 x 7 in.

2

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)
Multiple works

3

Andrew Casto
Assemblage 198, 2020
Porcelain and 18k Gold Luster
8 x 7 x 25.5 in

Maximalism was originally used to describe visual trends taking place in New York. Art historian, Robert Pincus-Witten, applied the term to the plate paintings of Julian Schnabel and the image-saturated paintings of David Salle. History then grouped these two artists, among many others, under the trendy moniker of Neo-Expressionism. That term also applied, in that there was a major reaction to the heavy-handed seriousness of reductive Minimalism. Maximalism has since been used to describe the paintings of Kim Dorland and Dana Schutz. It positions itself with regard to an abundance of materiality – paint, found objects, imagery. Jose Alvarez’ (D.O.P.A.) paintings bear a hallucinogenic, exuberant quality. The artist is interested in ecstatic visual and physical pleasure. His work is about sensate engagement that can transport the viewer beyond physical reality.
Andrew Casto’s unrefined, handmade, humorous ceramics are coated in pop color. Goopy, yet intentional, they revel in crudeness. His opposite counterpart is Matthew McConnell, who infuses his black, semi-legible ceramics with a certain uncanniness. He makes soft sculpture, reminiscent of everyday, banal objects, yet repurposed in a world of unfamiliarity.
1

Cody Hoyt
Untitled, 2020
Stoneware, porcelain, Purpleheart, Yellowheart, and epoxy
23 x 28 in.

2

Cody Hoyt
Low Oblique Vessel, 2020
Ceramic
8 x 13 x 7 in.

3

Russell Tyler
Multiple works

1

Alex McLeod
FDR, 2019
Digital video, ed. 4/5

2

Osamu Kobayashi
Reflection, 2020
Oil on canvas
44 x 40 in.

3

Roberto Gomez
Untitled, 2016
Black printing ink on latex
70 x 120 in.

Some of these artists vacillate between both a maximalist and minimalist approach. Russell Tyler, Osamu Kobayashi, Jason Stopa, and Kadar Brock have processes that are incredibly considered. Their paintings are labor intensive, yet the resulting images appear effortless and simplistic.
1

Roberto Gomez
Untitled, 2016
Black printing ink on latex
70 x 120 in.

2

Osamu Kobayashi
Slit, 2020
Oil on canvas
18 x 16 in.

3

Jason Stopa
Green Window, 2018
Oil on canvas
25 x 20 in.

4

Russell Tyler
Untitled, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
20 x 24 in.

5

Russell Tyler
Untitled, 2020
Acrylic on canvas
20 x 24 in.

6

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.)

The term Minimalism has been thrown around a lot. It has been used to sell furniture, clothes and even branded as an entire lifestyle. As an art historical term, it has been thoroughly divorced from its original usage. As Jorg Heiser notes, “[it] is not merely an ideal of reductive form, but also a methodology of allowing things to stand or speak for themselves in an unpretentious, matter-of-fact way, that is, without the claim of a grand genius mind purveying them; without the display of handicraft; replacing lyrical or dramatic movement with serial movement; and maybe most importantly: providing a structure in which production and reception can interact.”
1

Kadar Brock
Multiple works

2

Andrew Casto
Multiple works

1

Linda Lopez
Multiple works

2

Cody Hoyt
Untitled, 2020
Stoneware, porcelain, Purpleheart, Yellowheart, and epoxy
23 x 28 in.

The contingent that indicates an interest in reduction is interested in surface qualities, not a machine aesthetic but an aesthetic of tools/images that make paintings, sculptures. Cody Hoyt and Linda Lopez reveal a near obsessive fascination with geometry, yet their sculptures are playful, contradictory and mathematical. Hoyt is a trained as a printmaker, so it is unsurprising that his ceramics are pattern-based, with hard structural surfaces that look like woodcuts. Lopez makes ceramics that reference plush toys, nearly the opposite of what we associate with ceramics material properties. Alex Mcleod’s sculptures are hyperreal simulations of everyday objects, they border on functional design.

The important takeaway here is that these artists highlight spatial relationships between viewers and objects while drawing particular attention to the image being made. The works in this show reflect the varied potentialities at work in abstraction today. Utilizing the gallery space to full effect, the works on exhibit will reinforce and support the notion of diverse perspectives in contemporary art.

—Jason Stopa

1

Alex McLeod
FDR, 2019
Digital video, ed. 4/5

2

Osamu Kobayashi
Reflection, 2020
Oil on canvas
44 x 40 in.

About Mindy Solomon Gallery

Mindy Solomon Gallery specializes in contemporary emerging and mid-career artists and art advisory services. The gallery represents artists working in painting, sculpture, photography, and video in both narrative and non-objective styles. The gallery program explores the intersection of art and design through an ongoing dialog between two and three-dimensional objects, while embracing diasporic voices. Utilizing the gallery space as a platform for inventive exhibitions, museum visitations, and public lectures, Solomon invites a sense of community and aesthetic enrichment.

Solomon founded the gallery in 2009 in St. Petersburg, Florida, where she established her reputation as a contemporary art dealer. She is a Board member of the Miami Art Dealers Association and is currently located in the Little River Arts District of Miami.